Y-12 Blog

Posted: Monday, May 14, 2018 - 6:16pm

From left: Glenn Pfennigwerth, Alan Moore, Morgan Smith, Lorelei Woods, and Vincent Lamberti at the 2018 CNS Fellows ColloquiumFrom left: Glenn Pfennigwerth, Alan Moore, Morgan Smith, Lorelei Woods, and Vincent Lamberti at the 2018 CNS Fellows Colloquium

CNS recently hosted its inaugural Fellows Colloquium at Y-12, and CNS President and CEO Morgan Smith called it a historic day. The forum was established to highlight CNS’s vital technical work and to honor its first four fellows for their vast technical knowledge and their abilities to mentor others.

“This is our declaration—that we are an organization that does work of tremendous scientific and technical significance for our nation, and this work requires the very best. It’s our most senior scientific and technical rank or title and connotes that we are engaged in activities that merit this level of personnel — equal to what occurs elsewhere in high-technology industries,” said Smith.

Glenn Pfennigwerth (Uranium Fellow), Alan Moore (Metallurgy), Vincent Lamberti (Y-12 Surveillance), and Lorelei Woods (Pantex Surveillance) were recognized as our strategic advisors and top mentors and were pinned by Smith. With a combined 143 years of experience, these fellows set the bar high. Each fellow presented the state of their area of expertise, and 18 other Pantex and Y-12 technical experts presented posters covering diverse areas of expertise — from explosives and advanced manufacturing to nonproliferation and lithium.

“The colloquium was vitally important to showcase the great technical work we do and to honor the individuals who are leading us into the future,” said Ashley Stowe, CNS Fellows program manager. “The excitement for staff at Pantex and Y-12 encourages me as we move forward and continue to grow an excellent technical staff. This is just the beginning, however; we are already looking forward to hosting the 2019 colloquium at Pantex.”

The colloquium featured posters covering diverse areas of expertise — from explosives and advanced manufacturing to nonproliferation and lithium.The colloquium featured posters covering diverse areas of expertise — from explosives and advanced manufacturing to nonproliferation and lithium.

Tags:
Posted: Monday, May 14, 2018 - 6:11pm

Eight machinists recently completed the four-year apprentice program, which is a partnership between Consolidated Nuclear Security and the Atomic Trades and Labor Council, with classwork provided by Pellissippi State Technical Community College.Eight machinists recently completed the four-year apprentice program, which is a partnership between Consolidated Nuclear Security and the Atomic Trades and Labor Council, with classwork provided by Pellissippi State Technical Community College.

Family, co-workers and management came out recently to congratulate the seventh group of graduates from the Y-12 Apprentice Program. The program, which was reinstated at the site in 2008, has graduated 97 Y-12 employees in various crafts, such as boilermakers, carpenters, electricians, insulators, ironworker/riggers, machinists/millwrights, painters, pipefitters, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics, and welders. Apprentices are paired with qualified craftspeople to gain hands-on experience, and combined with required book work, they are trained to union specifications for journey worker status upon completion of the program.

The graduating class was made up of eight machinists who completed the four-year program, which is a partnership between Consolidated Nuclear Security and the Atomic Trades and Labor Council, with classwork provided by Pellissippi State Community College.

Y-12 Site Manager Bill Tindal applauded the graduates and encouraged them to take the place of their mentors in order to prepare the next generation.

Y-12 has an enduring mission, and you will help ensure its success. Long after each of us in this room has retired, another generation will be stepping up to ensure our country’s safety and security are preserved through Y-12’s future mission work,” he said. “As you learned from expert craftspeople and journey workers, I hope you’ll be willing to pass along your knowledge and skillsets to the next generation of craft workers.”

Atomic Trades and Labor Council President Mike Thompson pointed to the valuable relationship CNS and the ATLC have created with the Apprentice Program, and he extended thanks to the members of both groups that make up the Y-12 Apprenticeship Committee for all their work.

“This is a great accomplishment for you, CNS, and our union. This is something that can never be taken from you and will provide you a path to a career that you can be proud of,” he said. “I don’t have to tell you how good these jobs are. Take care of them for those who will follow you. As a young man in the late ‘70s and early ’80s, I could only hope for the opportunity that you have had to participate in this program.”

Posted: Monday, May 14, 2018 - 4:59pm

Y12’s expertise in handling uranium was called upon in 2010 for Project Golden Llama.

Y-12’s expertise in handling uranium was called upon in 2010 for Project Golden Llama. The project took highly enriched uranium from Chile, which was the fifth country to remove all of its HEU after an international call for countries to secure all vulnerable nuclear materials within four years.

During shipment preparations, an 8.8 magnitude earthquake occurred off the Chilean coast causing widespread damage to surrounding areas. Contingency plans were made, and the shipment made its way to Oak Ridge with minimal delay.

Operation Golden Llama Seal
Posted: Monday, May 14, 2018 - 4:34pm

Communications staff members with the flag and certificate from the 39th Commuications Squadron in Turkey. Communications staff members with the flag and certificate from the 39th Commuications Squadron in Turkey.

For almost two years, the Communications group at Y‑12 has sent care packages to coworker Lisa Harris’ son, who serves with the U.S. Air Force. The packages started as a way to make her son and his squadron’s deployment in Turkey more comfortable.

Harris said, “We’ve supported them as often as we can with small items they can carry with them — gum, granola, peanuts, cookies. We sent them things to help take their focus off being away from their families and friends for long periods of time.”

To show their appreciation for the gesture, the squadron sent a flag that was flown in the cockpit of an A‑10 Warthog during a mission. Harris said, “We never expected anything in return. To us, it was the least we could do.” The group plans to continue sending care packages to the 51 members of the Air Force stationed there.

The certificate, photograph and flag are displayed in the group’s area in Jack Case Center. The certificate, photograph and flag are displayed in the group’s area in Jack Case Center.
Posted: Monday, May 14, 2018 - 4:31pm

Dale Christenson (left) receives the Federal Project Director of the year award from Under Secretary of Energy Mark Menezes.Dale Christenson (left) receives the Federal Project Director of the year award from Under Secretary of Energy Mark Menezes.

Dale Christenson, project director of the Uranium Processing Facility, was presented the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Project Director of the Year Award on March 14. Christenson leads the NNSA’s $6.5 billion UPF project underway at Y-12. See the NNSA blog entry for more information.

Tags:

Pages